We are standing in the traditional territory of the Yelamu, a local tribe of the Ramaytush Ohlone peoples of the San Francisco Peninsula. The Yelamu understood the interconnectedness of all things and maintained harmony with nature for millennia. Beginning in the 18th century Spanish, Mexican, and American colonization displaced and eradicated Native peoples across California, including the Yelamu; however, a few other Ramaytush Ohlone families did survive. Today, they maintain a strong cultural and spiritual connection to their ancestral homeland, seeking to fulfill their responsibilities as stewards.  Let this land acknowledgement stand as a commitment to honoring the original peoples of this land and to uncovering the truths of the past that shape our present and future.

We encourage you to explore this show with curiosity about the specific Indigenous histories of the public and private lands in the photographs throughout the show.

portrait by Ohlone artist and culture bearer, Linda Yamane;
Etched into the window at Land's End as well as into the hearts of Ohlone People, a dancer offers sacred prayer in song and movement (portrait by Ohlone artist and culture bearer, Linda Yamane; photo by Gregg Castro)
Three generations of Ramaytush Ohlone share a 'Song of the People' to a classroom
Three generations of Ramaytush Ohlone share a 'Song of the People' to a classroom    (Photo of Gregg, Kenneth and Lilly Castro; photo by Elonda Castro)
Three generations of Ramaytush Ohlone share a 'Song of the People' to a classroom
A modern day simple handmade Ohlone soaproot brush     (Photo by Gregg Castro of brush he made)
A working example of an Ohlone Tule Boat, pictured with another in the water as a background
A working example of an Ohlone Tule Boat, pictured with another in the water as a background  (Tule Boat made by Linda Yamane; photo by Gregg Castro)
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